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Friday, January 6, 2017

I have seen things, man

I got on my second bus (it's a two-bus ride for me each morning, usually) at a different bus stop this morning, more north of where I usually get on (thanks to a lift from my husband so I could avoid my usual 2-bus transfer and a wait in the cold) and before the usual gang of hens I see each day. It's Courtice. There are only 11 of us who take Durham Transit buses in the morning. Everyone else drives. True story.

When they boarded, they stared at me like I had teleported and have unspoken answers about the fifth dimension. #hard-stares #we-don't-speak #i-know-things-you-don't

No idea how to translate this into a story...

It was one of those "I guess you had to be there" moments. I am dead serious when I say living in a small town commuting to the big city is truly a Groundhog Day (as in the movie) experience. You can set watches by when and where you will see people.

5 comments:

deepfish said...

The buses here in my part of Oakville do big loops. If I get up at 5:30 and walk 1 block north I can catch the bus.
Sleep in and get up at 5:50 and I can catch the same bus 1 block south as it heads to the GO station.
When I used to take that bus I would usually sleep in and choose the second option.
There was a guy - "that guy" - who ALWAYS sat in the same seat. Every fricking morning he would sit with his legs spread into the aisle.
The first morning I chose the earlier option, the bus was empty, I chose HIS seat.
When he got on you would have thought from the way he looked at me that I had been caught eating a baby...
Fun times in the First World.

C.J. Smith said...

^ So much truth.
The hens always sit in the same seats, too.
Should have really gone for gold this morning and done what you did

Squiggles said...

I used to do this with the GO train years ago!

They cannot deal with it and you can see the wheels just cranking in their head as they process.


So.much.fun.

G said...

It's actually quite an interesting psychological phenomenon: we are forced to make so many small decisions each day that we naturally seek to minimize unnecessary ones. Sitting in the exact same seat every day relieves us of having to choose where to sit. Psychologist Barry Schwartz wrote an interesting book about this about ten years back called "The Paradox of Choice".

And that's my nerdy contribution of the day.

Anonymous said...

One day I got on at Rouge Hill and took the first empty seat I saw in the second level. A woman got on and found me sitting there and, well, you'd think that her entire life had been destroyed forever because I was sitting in "her" seat!

Despite the stink-eye and nasty comments I got all the way to Union, I stayed where I was, as I didn't want to give her the satisfaction. These people must have pathetic little lives if something like this upsets them so much. Pitiful.